The cuisine of Switzerland - Europe

Europe Switzerland CH
Aargau Appenzell ausserrhoden Appenzell innerrhoden Basel-stadt Basel-stadt Bern Fribourg Geneva Glarus Graubbunden Jura Luzern Neuchatel Nidwalden Obwalden Schaffhausen Schwyz Solothurn St. Gallen Thurgau Ticino Uri Valais Vaud Zug Zurich

The foods of Switzerland

Cheese fondue
Melted cheese with bread cubes. The bread cubes are picked up on the fork and swivelled in the melted cheese, which is served in a traditional ceramic fondue pot called ‘caquelon’.
Raclette
Melted cheese served with "Gschwellti" (jacket potatoes), cocktail gherkins and onions as well as pickled fruit.
Älplermagronen
A kind of gratin with potatoes, macaroni, cheese, cream and onions. And most importantly, stewed apple on the side.
Rösti
A flat, hot cake made of grated, cooked jacket or raw potatoes and fried in hot butter or fat. The dish is bound by nothing apart from the starch contained in the potatoes.
Birchermüesli
Developed around about 1900 by the Swiss doctor Maximilian Oskar Bircher-Brenner, it contains oat flakes, lemon juice, condensed milk, grated apples, hazelnuts or almonds.
Swiss chocolate
Chocolate came to Europe in the course of the 16th century, by the 17th century at the very latest it became known and was produced in Switzerland as well. In the second half of the 19th century Swiss chocolate started to gain a reputation abroad. The invention of milk chocolate by Daniel Peter as well as the development of conching (fondant chocolate) by Rodolphe Lindt were closely connected with the rise of Swiss chocolate's renown.
Swiss cheese
One could quite easily explore Switzerland travelling from cheese dairy to cheese dairy. Each area of the country, each region has its own types of cheese – the diversity of products created from one single base ingredient – good Swiss milk – is quite astonishing! Such as, for example, the soft and melting Vacherin cheese. The aromatic Appenzeller. The full-flavoured Sbrinz. The Emmentaler, famous for its big holes. The world-famous Gruyère. Or the Tête de Moine which is shaved into decorative rosettes. All of these – and their round about 450 other cheese siblings – make a fondue, a raclette, an «afternoon snack platter» a culinary experience.

Cooking in Switzerland

on The World Cuisine
 

Cacio e Pepe Pasta

Cheese soufflé

Paella Valenciana

Caramel custard

Thai chicken lemon grass coconut soup -tom kai

Cacio e Pepe Pasta

Chicken Fingers

Sriracha sauce

Sweet and Sour Pork

 

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